Tag Archives: injury management

Injury Management Coordinators Course

Aurenda is excited to announce the introduction of our Injury Management Coordinators Course!

This is the first Employer-Focused program offered of its kind. Learn injury management principles from Australia’s Leaders in Injury Cost Reduction.

Aurenda’s Injury Management Coordinators Course will provide participants with insight into the many aspects of workers’ compensation. Attendees will gain skills and knowledge to enable those who have workplace injury management responsibilities to manage their injured workers in line with the rights and obligations contained in the Workers’ Compensation and Injury Management Act 1981 and Regulations.

Audience: Aurenda’s Injury Management Coordinators Course is designed for anyone who has responsibility for supervising or managing injured workers in the workplace. If you are a Safety Advisor, OSH Rep, Return to Work Coordinator, HR/Administration Advisor, involved in Payroll, or a direct Supervisor or Manager, this is an essential program to learn practical skills to proactively manage injured workers and their claims.

Course Focus: Aurenda’s three day course in injury management encompasses a multitude of topics that are relevant to the effective management of workplace injuries.

Day One:

  •     Workers’ Compensation Legislation
  •     Understanding Workers’ Compensation Premiums
  •     Applying a Compliant Injury Management System
  •     Weekly Payments
  •     Insurer’s Responsibilities
  •     Statutory Settlements and Closures

Day Two:

  •     Injury Management Systems in WA
  •     Planning and Developing an Injury Management Policy
  •     Injury Management Procedure
  •     Processing Claims
  •     Responsibilities of all Parties
  •     Develop rehabilitation programs and return to work plans
  •     Identifying alternate, modified or suitable duties

Day Three:

  •     Implementing Return to Work Strategies
  •     Effectiveness of Rehabilitation Services
  •     Communication Strategies in Workers’ Compensation
  •     Case Studies
  •     Managing Complex Claims

Optional Assessment
Completion of assessment for the unit below will constitute partial completion of Certificate IV of OH&S (BSB41407) or the Diploma of OH&S (BSB51307) qualification: BSBHIRM509A (Manage Rehabilitation or Return to Work Programs)

Our inaugural course is only a few weeks away. Be one of the first to enrol!

Duration: 3 days
Course Date: Wed 25 | Thu 26 | Fri 27 July 2012
Course Times: 8.00am – 4.00pm
Course Fee: $1,100.00 (includes GST component in relation to catering)
Registration Form: To download the Registration form Click here.

Don’t delay, take this opportunity of registering your interest at: training@aurenda.com

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Filed under Aurenda, Health and Safety Representatives, Injury Management, Occupational Health and Safety, Work Health and Safety, Workers Compensation, Workplace Injury

Q. A worker has sustained a serious injury in my workpalce. Who do I need to advise?

When someone is injured at work you are obliged to contact the following organisations:

  • If you are a client of Aurenda, contact us on (08) 6389 8989 – we will provide the next steps;
  • If you are not a client of ours, you will need to contact your insurer; and
  • Depending on the severity of the injury, you may also be required to notify WorkSafe WA or the relevant Authority in your state.

In Western Australia, reporting is required for employees who suffer death/ injury/ disease at work or at employer-provided residential premises as described under s23G(2) of the WA Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984.

Types of injuries that must be reported to WorkSafe WA:

  • Death.
  • A fracture of the skull, spine or pelvis.
  • A fracture of any bone in the arm, other than in the wrists or hand, or in the leg, other than a bone in the ankle or foot.
  • An amputation of an arm, a hand, finger, finger joint, leg, foot, toe or toe joint.
  • The loss of sight of an eye.
  • Any injury other than those referred to above which, in the opinion of a medical practitioner, is likely to prevent the employee from being able to work within 10 days of the day on which the injury occurred.

Types of diseases that must be reported:

Infectious diseases:

  • tuberculosis,
  • viral hepatitis,
  • legionnaire’s disease and
  • HIV

where these diseases are contracted during work involving exposure to human blood products, body secretions, excretions or other material which may be a source of infection.

Occupational zoonoses (diseases spread from one species (animals) to humans):

  • Q fever,
  • anthrax,
  • leptospiroses and
  • brucellosis

where these diseases are contracted during work involving the handling of, or contact with, animals, animal hides, skins, wool, hair, carcases or animal waste products.

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Q. I understand I need an Injury Management Policy? Is this true?

A. In Western Australia, the Workers’ Compensation and Injury Management Act requires all businesses to have an
1.    Injury Management Policy;
2.    Injury Management System; and
3.    Return to Work (Injury Management) Plans for all injured workers with less than a full capacity to return to work.

Just like your OHS Policy, your Injury Management Policy needs to be displayed in the workplace.  There are fines and penalties for not having one in place.  If you are requested to show an employee your Injury Management System you could be fined if you do not have one available.

There are similar requirements in all ten workers’ compensation jurisdictions across Australia; the terminology may change, but the principles are the same!

Your Injury Management System could be developed and maintained –

  • In-house by your own safety or human resources departments; or
  • Externally with the support of Aurenda, who have the expertise and tools to support your team.

Contact Aurenda on (08) 6389 8900 for advice on how to put this in place.

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Workplace falls followup

Back in February Aurenda wrote a blog about fall protection in the workplace.

https://aurenda.wordpress.com/2012/02/22/fall-protection-in-the-workplace/

This week two major companies have been fined for their failure to protect their staff from injury.

John Holland has been fined the maximum civil penalty of $242,000 by the Federal Court. The John Holland employee was working at BHP Billiton’s Mt Whaleback mine at Newman on March 19, 2009. The worker died after he stepped onto an unsecured sheet of grid mesh and fell 10 metres to the floor.
There had been two other incidents of injured due to this unsecured mesh earlier in the week and the employer had failed to do anything about it.

http://www.perthnow.com.au/business/john-holland-fined-over-wa-workers-death/story-e6frg2qc-1226338930675

In another incident in NSW, Supermarket giant Coles has been fined $170,000 and ordered to pay legal costs after a worker fell through a ceiling at a store in Sydney five years ago.
The worker, then 42, climbed over a handrail to access promotional material stored on a suspended plasterboard ceiling at the company’s Manly store in August 2007. The worker fell more than two metres, suffering lacerations to the head, whiplash and bruising.

The Coles Management knew that the plasterboard was unsafe to walk on and erected a barrier. However it still used the area as storage and failed to educate the staff as to the danger.

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/national/8458151/coles-fined-over-workers-fall

In both cases, the companies were aware of the dangers prior to the fatality and major injury respectively. If the death or injury of workers is not traumatic enough, both events were over three years ago. New legislation would mean the companies and their directors would be responsible for far larger fines.

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Is my injured worker allowed to choose his own doctor?

Yes, the legislation allows a worker to choose the doctor of their choice to manage their work place injury.  

However an employer retains the right to have their worker reviewed by a consultant doctor. You can refer them to your own doctor and they can choose their own.  So if they don’t have their own doctor, you can refer them to yours or if they choose their own, they would see two doctors. As part of your Injury Management Process, your company should have a nominated Consultant Doctor who is familiar with industrial health injuries and your workplace and its operations.  You can contact Aurenda on (08) 6389 8900 to discuss a suitable medical practice to assist with your workplace injury management.  

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Fall Protection in the Workplace

The recent death of a man in South Perth who fell from a cherry picker highlights the need for fall protection in the work place.

Aurenda believes fall protection is a simple and effective measure that is vital on every single construction work site in this country. Occupational health and safety in this industry is not a suggestion or something that can be ignored or forgotten because the risks are too great. Not only will members of this industry find themselves in dire economic trouble if they fail to follow the guidelines, the risk of debilitating injury or death is simply too great.

A few cases recently have highlighted the need and sometimes lack of fall protection equipment.

Incident 1
Just recently a NSW court has fined a company and its director after for a young new worker’s death. Despite requiring workers to wear a harness and lanyard when working at heights, a specialist demolition company failed to ensure the fall protection was anchored before workers were exposed to risk. The Court heard that in August 2007, the company began to dismantle the roof of a single-storey suburban house. Workers made an access point through the bathroom ceiling near the edge of the roof, but then had to climb unsecured up the roofing tiles to anchor their lanyards at the ridge board. An experienced worker already at the peak said he saw the new labourer move out onto the tiles, but did not see him fall. The injured worker sustained traumatic head injuries and fractured ribs, and died in hospital six days later.

Incident 2
Another incident occurred in Victoria where fall protection failed to be implemented, caused enormous economic fallout, as well the serious injury of an apprentice. The accident, which occurred in 2010 has only just been resolved. It occurred when four construction workers, including three apprentices, were replacing storm damaged roof tiles on a property. The 2.4 metre high rooftop working space didn’t not have the required guard rails installed, so when one of the apprentices lost his footing, he fell to ground, at which point cement splashed in his eye. While the fall itself did not hurt the apprentice, the cement damage which caused a number of following events, eventually lost him his sight in his left eye.

Incident 3
WorkCover NSW fined three companies over an accident involving serious injuries suffered by a 21 year old man who fell 14 meters off a scaffold at a paper mill. In that incident, safety practices across the entire project were questioned after the man fell through a 430mm gap between the scaffolding and wood chip machine.

For the Western Australian Code of Practise on Prevention of Falls in the Workplace go to
www.commerce.wa.gov.au/worksafe/PDF/Codes_of_Practice/code_falls.pdf 

http://www.aurenda.com

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What expenses am I liable for when someone has a workplace injury?

Q. What expenses am I liable for when someone has a workplace injury?

Managing Director:  The insurance company that underwrites your workers’ compensation policy is liable for wages up to $190,000 and medical expenses up to $50,000 (which can be extended by another $50,000 for a worker with a severe injury). These expenses can be extended by another $100,000 in serious cases, if the worker chooses to take the $100,000 and forego their Common Law entitlement. Rehabilitation can add another $12,000 and there are additional minor expenses, such as travel, that can also be reimbursed.  The consequence of these expenses is that it only takes one significant injury to add significant costs to your claims history. 

Client Service Manager:  A particularly important reminder for businesses with a monthly payroll is that employers must pay an injured worker their wage entitlements within 14 days of the insurer approving the claim. There is a $2,000 fine for failure to do so.

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